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Handicap

Keep track of your Handicap with the SCGA

The USGA Handicap System™ enables golfers of all skill levels to compete on an equitable basis. The USGA Web site offers links to The USGA Handicap System manual, the USGA's handicapping equivalent of The Rules of Golf. The current version of the USGA Handicap System went into effect on Jan. 1, 2012, and the next revision will take effect on Jan. 1, 2016. Any modifications to the system are noted on the USGA Web site. Visit the USGA's Web site to read the current manual.

Did you Know?

Scores from any course may be posted on any posting computer in Southern California.

If you have an R after your Handicap Index (i.e., 13.7R) it means your Handicap Index has automatically been reduced due to exceptional tournament scores under Section 10-3 of the USGA Handicap System.

If you have an M after your Handicap Index (i.e., 13.7M) it means the handicap committee has modified your Handicap Index under Section 8-4c of the USGA Handicap System.

Once you have completed 13 holes, you can post an 18-hole score.

For handicap purposes, if you start a hole but do not complete it or are conceded a stroke, record your most likely score.

Equitable Stroke Control must be applied to all scores, including tournament scores, for handicap purposes.

What do you mean by that??

Reduction vs. Restricted

The letter "R" after a Handicap Index is due to a "Reduction" from the USGA Handicap System, Section 10-3. This reduction is an alternate calculation of a Handicap Index for players with two or more eligible tournament scores. Restricted is the misnomer.

Par Plus vs. Net Par

Par Plus is the terminology used by the USGA to describe how to post a score for a hole that is not played or not played under The Rules of Golf. The score recoded for that hole for handicap purposes must be par plus any handicap strokes that player may be entitled to on that hole. This hole score, when recorded, should be preceded by an "X". Net Par is the misnomer.

Handicap Index vs. Course Handicap

These terms describe two different things. The Handicap Index is a number with a decimal point (i.e. 14.2) used to indicate a measurement of a player's potential ability on a course of standard playing difficulty. It is derived from a player's score differentials which are derived from a calculation using the adjusted gross score, the Course and Slope Rating of the course played and the USGA standard Slope (113). The Course Handicap indicates how many handicap strokes a player receives from a specific set of tees being played. The Course Handicap is determined by taking the Handicap Index and applying it to a Course Handicap Table.

Modified vs. Reduced

If you have an M after your Handicap Index (i.e., 14.7M) it means the Handicap Committee at your club has modified your Handicap Index under Section 8-4c under the USGA Handicap System

If you have an R after your Handicap Index (i.e., 8.3R) it means your Handicap Index has automatically been reduced due to exceptional tournament scores under Section 10-3 of the USGA Handicap System.

Both are deemed a Handicap Index.